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Jacob Padilla

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  1. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Ron Mexico in Why the hate   
    Look at the numbers I put above. Teddy is really effective off the ball as a catch-and-shoot player. He's very good running off screens. His most common play type this season (nearly a quarter of his possessions) is as a spot-up player where he's catching and shooting or attacking closeouts. A good point guard would allow Nebraska to take better advantage of his abilities in all those areas.
     
    Better shooters around him would create more space for him to work with inside the arc. He's also been a noticeably more willing passer since he came back from his benching, getting into the paint and kicking out to guys on the perimeter quite often the last handful of games.
     
    He is a good pick-and-roll player. A legit roll man threat would both allow him to take advantage of that part of his game more and it would create more opportunities for himself or to kick to a corner shooter with the roll man's gravity.
     
    Heading into Thursday, Synergy had classified just 31 of his possessions as true isolation plays (8.3%). He's also not doing particularly well with the post touches so Nebraska can probably just take those out of the game plan. 
  2. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Ron Mexico in Why the hate   
    To add even more to this, Teddy is an excellent pick-and-roll player as both a scorer and passer(1.109 PPP, 85th percentile) and he's also excellent as a catch-and-shoot player (1.304 PPP, 88th percentile). He doesn't have to dominate the ball or isolate all the time. Get him a competent roll man (Walker's filled this roll nicely) and a point guard who can consistently set him up for jumpers and you've got a really dynamic offensive player on your hands.
     
    That being said, he's also one of the best off-the-dribble shooters in the Big Ten, so...
  3. Like
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Ron Mexico in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  4. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Shawn Eichorst's Toupee in Why the hate   
    To add even more to this, Teddy is an excellent pick-and-roll player as both a scorer and passer(1.109 PPP, 85th percentile) and he's also excellent as a catch-and-shoot player (1.304 PPP, 88th percentile). He doesn't have to dominate the ball or isolate all the time. Get him a competent roll man (Walker's filled this roll nicely) and a point guard who can consistently set him up for jumpers and you've got a really dynamic offensive player on your hands.
     
    That being said, he's also one of the best off-the-dribble shooters in the Big Ten, so...
  5. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Go Big Fred in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  6. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from BjoeHusker in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  7. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Art Vandalay in Why the hate   
    Look at the numbers I put above. Teddy is really effective off the ball as a catch-and-shoot player. He's very good running off screens. His most common play type this season (nearly a quarter of his possessions) is as a spot-up player where he's catching and shooting or attacking closeouts. A good point guard would allow Nebraska to take better advantage of his abilities in all those areas.
     
    Better shooters around him would create more space for him to work with inside the arc. He's also been a noticeably more willing passer since he came back from his benching, getting into the paint and kicking out to guys on the perimeter quite often the last handful of games.
     
    He is a good pick-and-roll player. A legit roll man threat would both allow him to take advantage of that part of his game more and it would create more opportunities for himself or to kick to a corner shooter with the roll man's gravity.
     
    Heading into Thursday, Synergy had classified just 31 of his possessions as true isolation plays (8.3%). He's also not doing particularly well with the post touches so Nebraska can probably just take those out of the game plan. 
  8. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from B-town hoopsfan in Why the hate   
    Look at the numbers I put above. Teddy is really effective off the ball as a catch-and-shoot player. He's very good running off screens. His most common play type this season (nearly a quarter of his possessions) is as a spot-up player where he's catching and shooting or attacking closeouts. A good point guard would allow Nebraska to take better advantage of his abilities in all those areas.
     
    Better shooters around him would create more space for him to work with inside the arc. He's also been a noticeably more willing passer since he came back from his benching, getting into the paint and kicking out to guys on the perimeter quite often the last handful of games.
     
    He is a good pick-and-roll player. A legit roll man threat would both allow him to take advantage of that part of his game more and it would create more opportunities for himself or to kick to a corner shooter with the roll man's gravity.
     
    Heading into Thursday, Synergy had classified just 31 of his possessions as true isolation plays (8.3%). He's also not doing particularly well with the post touches so Nebraska can probably just take those out of the game plan. 
  9. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from TheNovice in Why the hate   
    Look at the numbers I put above. Teddy is really effective off the ball as a catch-and-shoot player. He's very good running off screens. His most common play type this season (nearly a quarter of his possessions) is as a spot-up player where he's catching and shooting or attacking closeouts. A good point guard would allow Nebraska to take better advantage of his abilities in all those areas.
     
    Better shooters around him would create more space for him to work with inside the arc. He's also been a noticeably more willing passer since he came back from his benching, getting into the paint and kicking out to guys on the perimeter quite often the last handful of games.
     
    He is a good pick-and-roll player. A legit roll man threat would both allow him to take advantage of that part of his game more and it would create more opportunities for himself or to kick to a corner shooter with the roll man's gravity.
     
    Heading into Thursday, Synergy had classified just 31 of his possessions as true isolation plays (8.3%). He's also not doing particularly well with the post touches so Nebraska can probably just take those out of the game plan. 
  10. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from TheNovice in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  11. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Dead Dog Alley in Why the hate   
    To add even more to this, Teddy is an excellent pick-and-roll player as both a scorer and passer(1.109 PPP, 85th percentile) and he's also excellent as a catch-and-shoot player (1.304 PPP, 88th percentile). He doesn't have to dominate the ball or isolate all the time. Get him a competent roll man (Walker's filled this roll nicely) and a point guard who can consistently set him up for jumpers and you've got a really dynamic offensive player on your hands.
     
    That being said, he's also one of the best off-the-dribble shooters in the Big Ten, so...
  12. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla reacted to Nebrasketball1979 in Why the hate   
    Hahaha, I was going to point out part of the flaw in your Melo comparison but then I hurt my eyes and finally got out the magnifying glass and saw your addendum.  I've often thought of the Melo comparison with Teddy.  However, what we saw last game was Teddy becoming a facilitator and making some very good passes that led to easy points.  He's also been shooting efficiently and north of 50%.  Now, if he's distributing the ball appropriately (i.e. not being a ball stopping offensive flow killer like Melo), what are we really complaining about?  Can Teddy carry this team on his own...no.  Can he be an important piece to a rebuilding team, absolutely.  We seem quick to anoint Bryce McGowens as a program savior (heck, Fred implied this himself) but I'm not seeing him as a generational talent.  Hopefully Bryce is another important piece to the puzzle and if you accumulate enough pieces, we will turn the corner.  I just don't get why we're expecting Teddy to carry this team by himself.  Outside of a Lebron or KD type talent, you need to surround talented players with other talented players.  Teddy is a talented player, Bryce seems to be a talented player but we need to add more talented players and specifically pieces that fit the right roles (i.e. spot up shooters, and a PG who can distribute).  It's really not that complicated.
     
     
  13. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from jayschool in Why the hate   
    To add even more to this, Teddy is an excellent pick-and-roll player as both a scorer and passer(1.109 PPP, 85th percentile) and he's also excellent as a catch-and-shoot player (1.304 PPP, 88th percentile). He doesn't have to dominate the ball or isolate all the time. Get him a competent roll man (Walker's filled this roll nicely) and a point guard who can consistently set him up for jumpers and you've got a really dynamic offensive player on your hands.
     
    That being said, he's also one of the best off-the-dribble shooters in the Big Ten, so...
  14. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from jaimes2000 in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  15. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Art Vandalay in Why the hate   
    To add even more to this, Teddy is an excellent pick-and-roll player as both a scorer and passer(1.109 PPP, 85th percentile) and he's also excellent as a catch-and-shoot player (1.304 PPP, 88th percentile). He doesn't have to dominate the ball or isolate all the time. Get him a competent roll man (Walker's filled this roll nicely) and a point guard who can consistently set him up for jumpers and you've got a really dynamic offensive player on your hands.
     
    That being said, he's also one of the best off-the-dribble shooters in the Big Ten, so...
  16. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from jayschool in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  17. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from LNKtrnsplnt in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  18. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from atskooc in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  19. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from cornfed24-7 in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  20. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Art Vandalay in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  21. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Shawn Eichorst's Toupee in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  22. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from REDZONEDAN in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  23. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Nebrasketball1979 in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  24. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Silverbacked1 in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
  25. Upvote
    Jacob Padilla got a reaction from Bugeaters1 in Why the hate   
    Teddy Allen is scoring 0.967 points per possession, which Synergy classifies as "very good" and in the 73rd percentile. He's "very good" both in the halfcourt and in transition.
     
    He's in the 72nd percentile or better in each of his top four play types (spot up = 1.033 PPP, 72%; transition = 1.173 PPP, 74%; off screen = 1.128, 76%; P&R ball-handler = 0.921, 82%). He's also in the 64th percentile in isolation after that Penn State game, scoring 0.867 PPP ("good"). Teddy is above average at almost everything he does offensively. The man-to-man defense and turnover issues are a problem, but there are a lot of talented players that struggle in those areas yet still succeed. If you can't find a way to win with that, that's probably more of a you problem than a Teddy one. He's the least of Nebraska's problems, especially with the way he's been playing the last several games.
     
    I think people get too caught up on the 1, 2 or 3 plays a game that look really bad. He's still a net positive even with a bad shot here and there, and honestly, some of those "bad shots" have a better chance of going in than a lot of the other things Nebraska has been doing on offense. Between shot attempts, free-throw attempts, assists and turnovers, Teddy's using up roughly 20 possessions per game. Nebraska is averaging 74.4 possessions per game. Other guys have plenty of opportunities to stay involved.
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