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Message from the Nebraska Basketball Team


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Yesterday, the team came out and one by one named someone they were standing for.

 

 

At the end Kobe Webster and Teddy Allen read from notes they had brought with them.

 

Webster: "We stand together as one to find ways to educate people to hopefully stop this terrible trend of lives being lost for no reason. This is not a political fight. This is about being a decent human being. Hate is such a strong word that is unfortunately used and acted on too much in today's world. We know we are not going to change everything that is going on by standing here today. The goal for us is simply to make our community and our state stand behind us and in not accepting these injustices as ok and turning a blind eye. We cannot allow this great country to be filled with so much hatred and anger towards one another. It is not a place that we want to live in when knowing that when we leave the house we might not return because someone views us as a threat. A threat being our skin color or wearing a hoodie, or by simply looking different than someone else, or sadly by sitting in our own living room."

 

Allen: "There is no denying that we have different stories and backgrounds. We all have moments in our life where we've had to overcome something, but the color of my skin is different, putting me at a higher risk. We are tired about talking about the same things over and over while losing precious lives along the way. Are we fighting a pointless fight? How many more hashtags need to be created by the police for people to start caring? We cannot only care when it is convenient; we cannot only care when it impacts us directly. Caring about someone else's life should fall within basic human ideals. We are standing here together as black and white people making it clear that we are sickened by the events in our country involving police brutality and systematic injustices towards our black people. We want to play a roll in change and we want you all to join us. No more hashtags, only change."

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I'm not sure if Webster and Allen wrote individual statements or if these were collaborations with teammates. I thought it was important to dictate what Webster and Allen said for the same reason I often do with regular coach pressers: it's personally easier for me to process written information than spoken. 

 

I've thought that Webster and Allen would probably be among the leading scorers on this team; those two speaking as opposed to someone like Derrick Walker who was here last year and has been an established voice for this team sort of points to those two being the leaders on the court that guys look to at the end of a game. The other thing I'd point out is that these players didn't need to come out and make a statement, and the coaching staff didn't need to participate and the support staff didn't need to set up a press conference; they did so because they felt it was the right thing to do. 

 

 

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I've said my thoughts on the current Jacob Blake situation.  Not going to repeat them.

 

As for the team's statement, this is very well done.  It's a great use of a platform to get a message across.  The words were carefully chosen to both a) bring light to a cause they care deeply about and b) unify rather than divide.  Kudos.  For the record, I also think the NBA did it correctly even though I obviously take issue with the timing.

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I'm an academic as the brunt of my living.  There are three things from my research I would propose to empower our Black American families:

 

1.  Universal Pre-K.  There should be no political argument here.  It is not a child's fault what situation he is born into.  80% of the brain is developed by roughly age 6.  We need compulsory education starting at age 2.  This isn't my opinion.  The literature is conclusive.  The age 5 compulsory start for children is completely arbitrary.  

 

2.  A 60-year housing discount for Black families to reverse the FDR (and beyond) redlining over a 60 year period in the 20th century.   Here's a fairly entertaining video of how the American hood was invented.  While I do think there are massive cultural problems in places like inner city Chicago, it is important to note that the slums of our country are artificial in nature.  When artificial things are created and there is a constant critical mass, unnatural chaotic things tend to happen.  This was a state-sponsored and state-designed implementation, and it is up to the state to do what they can to reverse it.

 

 

3.  Legalize marijuana.  Our prison system is completely insane and loaded with non-violent criminals.  Increase freedom and get the government out of the personal choices of adults.  This would also greatly hurt Mexican cartels and decrease illegal immigration.  We tried prohibition once.  It's a colossal waste of time and tax dollars.

 

I'm happy to entertain cordial discussions on the topics I've listed above from any viewpoint anyone wants to put forward.  I've always been impressed with the civility and intellect of this board.  Intellectual diversity is a good thing.  Communication is a good thing.  I don't find it particularly profound to point out that oppression exists.  That's kind of an undergraduate thing, but it's a good place to start for critical thinking.  I'm more interested in solutions, and I don't think anyone on the known political spectrum is attempting to do this right now.  

 

Otherwise, I'm happy to leave this here as a (hopefully perceived) relevant contribution to the original post.  

 

 

 

 

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57 minutes ago, LK1 said:

I'm an academic as the brunt of my living.  There are three things from my research I would propose to empower our Black American families:

 

1.  Universal Pre-K.  There should be no political argument here.  It is not a child's fault what situation he is born into.  80% of the brain is developed by roughly age 6.  We need compulsory education starting at age 2.  This isn't my opinion.  The literature is conclusive.  The age 5 compulsory start for children is completely arbitrary.  

 

2.  A 60-year housing discount for Black families to reverse the FDR (and beyond) redlining over a 60 year period in the 20th century.   Here's a fairly entertaining video of how the American hood was invented.  While I do think there are massive cultural problems in places like inner city Chicago, it is important to note that the slums of our country are artificial in nature.  When artificial things are created and there is a constant critical mass, unnatural chaotic things tend to happen.  This was a state-sponsored and state-designed implementation, and it is up to the state to do what they can to reverse it.

 

 

3.  Legalize marijuana.  Our prison system is completely insane and loaded with non-violent criminals.  Increase freedom and get the government out of the personal choices of adults.  This would also greatly hurt Mexican cartels and decrease illegal immigration.  We tried prohibition once.  It's a colossal waste of time and tax dollars.

 

I'm happy to entertain cordial discussions on the topics I've listed above from any viewpoint anyone wants to put forward.  I've always been impressed with the civility and intellect of this board.  Intellectual diversity is a good thing.  Communication is a good thing.  I don't find it particularly profound to point out that oppression exists.  That's kind of an undergraduate thing, but it's a good place to start for critical thinking.  I'm more interested in solutions, and I don't think anyone on the known political spectrum is attempting to do this right now.  

 

Otherwise, I'm happy to leave this here as a (hopefully perceived) relevant contribution to the original post.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

I agree with everything here, and I would add, we should also find a way to massively increase spending on inner-city schools, primary and secondary.

 

As to your third point, it seems to me like we're getting to the tipping point of getting marijuana legalized nationwide.  We're approaching 50% of states that have either fully legalized it (11 states + DC) or allow medicinal use + decriminalization (12 states).

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5 hours ago, LK1 said:

2.  A 60-year housing discount for Black families to reverse the FDR (and beyond) redlining over a 60 year period in the 20th century.  

 

What is a "housing discount?"  Like a special low mortgage rate that only black people can qualify for?  And how do you decide who gets the discount?  Do 21st Century immigrants from Africa get it, just because of their skin color?  What about people from multiple racial backgrounds?  

 

Personally, I think you're leaving out one of the best options, universal basic income.  UBI would raise the quality of life for those in poverty, while also providing a financial safety net for people wanting to start their own business, take time off to pursue advanced education, etc.  

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26 minutes ago, aphilso1 said:

 

What is a "housing discount?"  Like a special low mortgage rate that only black people can qualify for?  And how do you decide who gets the discount?  Do 21st Century immigrants from Africa get it, just because of their skin color?  What about people from multiple racial backgrounds?  

 

Personally, I think you're leaving out one of the best options, universal basic income.  UBI would raise the quality of life for those in poverty, while also providing a financial safety net for people wanting to start their own business, take time off to pursue advanced education, etc.  


It would be proven descendants of Black Americans who lived between the 1920s and 1970s.  That’s who would get the discount, yes.  The generational wealth accrued for non-Black Americans during that period was fundamentally devastating, and I believe the government owes for their state-sponsored systemic racism.  

 

As for UBI, I get the argument.  I’m not sold, but certainly Yang is on to something with regard to inevitable automation.  It’s the psychological research that I’m not certain supports his hypothesis as to what people would do with the money.  

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16 hours ago, cipsucks said:

It would have been impressive had they read out loud and asked people of all color to follow the principals of Martin Luther King.  Maybe too much to ask that people actually are taught American history today....

 

http://www.tparents.org/Library/Unification/Talks2/King/King-630000.htm

The proper way to celebrate the legacy of a man is to truly know it. MLK was far from the Hallmark greeting card he has been turned into.  He also said “the riot is the language of the unheard,” was a social-democrat long before Bernie, felt we should have a universal basic income, called for the end of the Vietnam war and condemned the American government, calling it “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today,” decried the “two America’s” and was voted the most hated man in America all while sleeping with a lot a Black women who were not his wife. He was human like the rest of us. Great and flawed. People don’t need to agree with everything he believes but if we study “real” history we should know who the real man was. 
 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/time.com/5197679/10-historians-martin-luther-king-jr/%3famp=true

Edited by Dean Smith
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10 hours ago, Dean Smith said:

The proper way to celebrate the legacy of a man is to truly know it. MLK was far from the Hallmark greeting card he has been turned into.  He also said “the riot is the language of the unheard,” was a social-democrat long before Bernie, felt we should have a universal basic income, called for the end of the Vietnam war and condemned the American government, calling it “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today,” decried the “two America’s” and was voted the most hated man in America all while sleeping with a lot a Black women who were not his wife. He was human like the rest of us. Great and flawed. People don’t need to agree with everything he believes but if we study “real” history we should know who the real man was. 
 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/time.com/5197679/10-historians-martin-luther-king-jr/%3famp=true

 

I was only referencing the pledge he made his followers sign in the early sixties.  Nothing more, nothing less.  Thanks for not disappointing me with your response.

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Anyone interested in learning about MLK should also read Hampton Sides excellent account of his demise.                https://www.amazon.com/Hellhound-His-Trail-Electrifying-American/dp/0307387437/ref=sr_1_2?crid=1O7E5VCAGQS3W&dchild=1&keywords=hellhound+on+his+trail+by+hampton+sides&qid=1598726252&s=books&sprefix=Hellhound%2Caps%2C207&sr=1-2                           

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On 8/29/2020 at 12:46 PM, cipsucks said:

 

I was only referencing the pledge he made his followers sign in the early sixties.  Nothing more, nothing less.  Thanks for not disappointing me with your response.

I note a touch of sarcasm. You said people should actually be taught history and my response was that many times what is taught as history is truncated and therefore misleading. MLK, like all of us was a complicated person. Though never forsaking non-violence, he became much more radical, marginalized by the mainstream civil rights movement, and hated by white America by the time of his death.  When we leave out inconvenient truths and teach only great man history the common person feels there is nothing they can do to affect change because they aren’t “great.”  We can all be great, we are all flawed, we can all be part of affecting the change that we as individuals want in the world.
 

I have a gut feeling we probably have different views of what we want the future world to look like, but we should both be provided the opportunity and allowed the use of the tools that our system is supposed to guarantee all of us, to try to create the future we want.
 

I admit that’s a very hopeful, optimistic view of what we can be as human beings and a nation. It should be an easy target for your sarcasm. 

 

The cartoon is from 1967. 5E932334-CBEE-4037-BF89-EEEE4EE00BA7.jpeg

Edited by Dean Smith
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8 hours ago, jimmykc said:

Anyone interested in learning about MLK should also read Hampton Sides excellent account of his demise.                https://www.amazon.com/Hellhound-His-Trail-Electrifying-American/dp/0307387437/ref=sr_1_2?crid=1O7E5VCAGQS3W&dchild=1&keywords=hellhound+on+his+trail+by+hampton+sides&qid=1598726252&s=books&sprefix=Hellhound%2Caps%2C207&sr=1-2                           

Excellent book indeed. 

 

For many of us who lived through the Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy, Black Panther era we were likely hoping and praying that this country progressed.  I guess we have a bit with womens rights.  And despite the current issues we have made some progress with the rights of people of color (I also choose to include Native Americans).  BUT, we have a ways to go.  

 

Those individuals though, that are trying to make this about politics...please stop.  This is not about a vote or a politician.   This is a systematic social problem that starts at home with parents and teachers and preachers and discipline.  Learn that there is a right way and a wrong way.  If you choose the wrong way, there will be repercussions or a price to pay.  As my parents like to say if you commit the crime then be preapared to do the time.  Nuff said. 

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27 minutes ago, Huskerpapa said:

 

 

Those individuals though, that are trying to make this about politics...please stop.  This is not about a vote or a politician.   This is a systematic social problem that starts at home with parents and teachers and preachers and discipline.  Learn that there is a right way and a wrong way.  If you choose the wrong way, there will be repercussions or a price to pay.  As my parents like to say if you commit the crime then be preapared to do the time.  Nuff said. 


If this was directed at what I wrote (not saying it was), I agree that part of the issue is cultural, but that culture was developed in an artificial, state-sponsored environment designed to fail.  There are policies that could greatly help reverse these trends (child brain development, home ownership, generational wealth, prison reform) that could position young people in these environments to get out, create nuclear families, and actually have bootstraps with which they can pull themselves up. 
 

People of color in the suburbs do not have these inner city cultural problems or crime rates.  It’s a poverty issue, and that poverty was state sponsored and intentional in its creation.  Political examination is, therefore, unavoidable, and is the prerequisite for socio-cultural reform. You cannot have one without the other.  

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On 8/29/2020 at 9:41 PM, Dean Smith said:

I note a touch of sarcasm. You said people should actually be taught history and my response was that many times what is taught as history is truncated and therefore misleading. MLK, like all of us was a complicated person. Though never forsaking non-violence, he became much more radical, marginalized by the mainstream civil rights movement, and hated by white America by the time of his death.  When we leave out inconvenient truths and teach only great man history the common person feels there is nothing they can do to affect change because they aren’t “great.”  We can all be great, we are all flawed, we can all be part of affecting the change that we as individuals want in the world.
 

I have a gut feeling we probably have different views of what we want the future world to look like, but we should both be provided the opportunity and allowed the use of the tools that our system is supposed to guarantee all of us, to try to create the future we want.
 

I admit that’s a very hopeful, optimistic view of what we can be as human beings and a nation. It should be an easy target for your sarcasm. 

 

The cartoon is from 1967. 5E932334-CBEE-4037-BF89-EEEE4EE00BA7.jpeg

 

You're absolutely right, Dean.  Thanks for opening the window.

 

 

Don't you dare delete this post, Dimes....

 

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I’d like to share a story concerning MLK & systemic racism. I lived across the street from a “Cop Bar” in Mpls for 10 years. I walked in there the morning of MLK Day, must have been 2012/13  & one Cop said to the other “If we just would’ve shot four more of ‘em, we’d have the whole week off”...

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18 hours ago, cipsucks said:

Don't you dare delete this post, Dimes....

 

For anyone's future reference this is equivalent to throwing on your hazard lights in a tow away zone.

 

To circle back, right, wrong or indifferent what the guys said was what they said. To me there is more meaning in having to collect, process, and state your own thoughts and opinions than reciting them from someone else. That's sort of the point of an university education.

 

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