Jump to content

Recommended Posts

On 6/24/2018 at 12:03 AM, TimSmiles said:

i honestly thought he'd been done with college basketball for like 3 years.

 

He ended up receiving a medical redshirt after he tore his acl in 2015-16

 

13-14 Freshman year at Louisville

14-15 Transfers mid season to Georgetown

15-16 Eligible to play midseason but tore his ACL - get medical this season which somehow resets him playing at Louisville for half a season

16-17 Full season at Georgetown

17-18 Full season at SMU

18-19 Back to Louisville

 

 

On 6/23/2018 at 4:54 PM, bleujay said:

does a player rack up any sort of debt by moving around that much...sheesh. How does he have eligibility remaining

 

He's going to get a masters degree out of it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, DOATHLON said:

There's lots of random worthless masters degrees available. Sociology comes to mind. Same for communications. Just saying. 

Those have to be earned. They aren’t random and they aren’t worthless. Sociology is a science. Not many people could handle the math or suffer the tedium needed to successfully complete a sociological study.  This field has offered great insight into the workings of society and explanations and possible solutions for many disfunctions. I think a great sociological study would be the connection between the susceptibility of people to believe lies and misinformation in this country and the debasing and  unappreciation of science and education  that exist here like no other  developed nation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Dean Smith said:

Those have to be earned. They aren’t random and they aren’t worthless. Sociology is a science. Not many people could handle the math or suffer the tedium needed to successfully complete a sociological study.  This field has offered great insight into the workings of society and explanations and possible solutions for many disfunctions. I think a great sociological study would be the connection between the susceptibility of people to believe lies and misinformation in this country and the debasing and  unappreciation of science and education  that exist here like no other  developed nation. 

 

 Wow, I would love to have a debate on the last sentence, but it's a hoops board so I will refrain. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Dean Smith said:

Those have to be earned. They aren’t random and they aren’t worthless. Sociology is a science. Not many people could handle the math or suffer the tedium needed to successfully complete a sociological study.  This field has offered great insight into the workings of society and explanations and possible solutions for many disfunctions. I think a great sociological study would be the connection between the susceptibility of people to believe lies and misinformation in this country and the debasing and  unappreciation of science and education  that exist here like no other  developed nation. 

 

What percentage of people with Masters degrees in sociology are working as sociologists and what percentage are working on the fry line at Jack in the Box?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, colhusker said:

Did he speak gooder than you?

 

No.

 

Edit:  Strike that last answer.  That's not true.  He was actually very bright and willing to do work that he could easily and understandably have viewed as being beneath him.

 

I actually respected him a lot for that.

Edited by Norm Peterson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Norm Peterson said:

By the way, I checked his bio on the SMU website.  Akoy was working on his Masters in Management.

 

Probably gives him a little more advantage in the job market than a Masters in Soc.

 

Good for Akoy.  There's a certain symmetry in him returning to where he started.

That’s sort of my point. Education used to be valued for more than its ability to get you a job. As we reduce our high schools to trade schools with its curriculum created by the Chamber of Commerce and devalue liberal arts education we get people that know how to do a skill that will get them paid but never given the chance to  develope higher learning and critical thinking skills. We end up with a lot of people that struggle thinking for themselves and being able to analyze information to sort facts from beliefs. Don’t get me wrong, education needs to give people skills to succeed in like and that includes employment, but there are a lot of other skills needed to be successful in life that we are missing out on as we devalue a well rounded education.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Below are results of a survey of employers conducted by the American Association of Colleges and Universities, querying those employers' priorities for the most important college learning outcomes.  Among those outcomes most commonly cited are those learned in the social sciences and humanities - critical thinking, problem solving, speaking, writing, as well as general knowledge and understanding of the world around you.  In sum, well-rounded citizens make better employees. Learn more about the survey here.

 

Also, when does basketball season start?

Screen Shot 2018-06-28 at 10.08.41 AM.png

Edited by Cornhoopers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Dean Smith said:

That’s sort of my point. Education used to be valued for more than its ability to get you a job. As we reduce our high schools to trade schools with its curriculum created by the Chamber of Commerce and devalue liberal arts education we get people that know how to do a skill that will get them paid but never given the chance to  develope higher learning and critical thinking skills. We end up with a lot of people that struggle thinking for themselves and being able to analyze information to sort facts from beliefs. Don’t get me wrong, education needs to give people skills to succeed in like and that includes employment, but there are a lot of other skills needed to be successful in life that we are missing out on as we devalue a well rounded education.  

 

Seeking that good old-fashioned liberal arts education was one thing back in the day when you could pay your own way through college, when tuition at Nebraska was $20/credit hour, and you could emerge with a degree and not a lot of debt.  AND when college was something not everyone did when they graduated high school, and having a degree actually  meant something and allowed you to separate yourself from your peer group.

 

Nowadays, college is expensive as hell, primarily because so many more people are attending (law of supply-demand) and a college degree in and of itself no longer gives you the advantages it once did.  So, now, people have to be more pragmatic about what they choose to study.  There are a lot of fluff degrees out there that didn't exist 30 years ago.  And you can study those things if you don't have to worry about crushing student loan debt when you graduate.  But, if you're going to incur a bunch of debt, you really can't afford to go to school just for the learning and seeking knowledge as its own end.

 

#Reality

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Norm Peterson said:

 

Seeking that good old-fashioned liberal arts education was one thing back in the day when you could pay your own way through college, when tuition at Nebraska was $20/credit hour, and you could emerge with a degree and not a lot of debt.  AND when college was something not everyone did when they graduated high school, and having a degree actually  meant something and allowed you to separate yourself from your peer group.

 

Nowadays, college is expensive as hell, primarily because so many more people are attending (law of supply-demand) and a college degree in and of itself no longer gives you the advantages it once did.  So, now, people have to be more pragmatic about what they choose to study.  There are a lot of fluff degrees out there that didn't exist 30 years ago.  And you can study those things if you don't have to worry about crushing student loan debt when you graduate.  But, if you're going to incur a bunch of debt, you really can't afford to go to school just for the learning and seeking knowledge as its own end.

 

#Reality

First of all, a college degree is more important in determining your employment chances and pay today than ever before. According to the latest statistics I saw, college graduates earned on average 56% more than those with just a high school degree. That's right at about $2.3 million in a lifetime. And just in the last couple of years the number of those employed holding college degree now outnumbers those without. Those with a college degree are more likely to be employed, more likely to be married, own their own home, and be saving for retirement. The advantage it gives today is larger than in the past where it was possible to drop out of high school and go work on the Ford or Chevy assembly line for $20-30 an hour. Those jobs are gone now.

 

I agree with you about the effects of college debt but it is not a primary function of supply and demand. Other developed counties send people to college without the debt and have much better occupation internship programs for high school students. Post World War II GI benefit users created the largest increase in demand for college education in our history but did not create the rising costs. The economy and politics of the '70's created the jump in cost. We have recordings from the Oval Office of both Johnson (Democrat) and Nixon (Republican) discussing how increasing the debt of college graduates would be the best way to control and limit anti-war and civil rights protesters. That and the simple economics of the effects of double-digit inflation lead to a great reduction in government support to universities. Schools had to make up that money from somewhere and that that lead to the rise in tuition and fees. It has also lead to universities relying heavily on adjunct professors that earn around $25 thousand a year with no benefits but that's for a different discussion. 

 

Our economy soared in the '50's due largely to the increased number of college graduates earning more and then spending more money. There are your effects of supply and demand. The quickest way to jumpstart our economy would be to allow more people to graduate with some sort of tertiary education and without the debt. That would lead to a huge infusion of cash into our economy.

 

Really all my first post was trying to say I don't think we as a nation value education and science as much as we should (in hindsight since my evidence was mostly anecdotal I should have said Nebraskans don't value education and science as much as we should)  and I am really looking forward to the start basketball season.

Edited by Dean Smith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Dean Smith said:

First of all, a college degree is more important in determining your employment chances and pay today than ever before. According to the latest statistics I saw, college graduates earned on average 56% more than those with just a high school degree. That's right at about $2.3 million in a lifetime. And just in the last couple of years the number of those employed holding college degree now outnumbers those without. Those with a college degree are more likely to be employed, more likely to be married, own their own home, and be saving for retirement. The advantage it gives today is larger than in the past where it was possible to drop out of high school and go work on the Ford or Chevy assembly line for $20-30 an hour. Those jobs are gone now.

 

I agree with you about the effects of college debt but it is not a primary function of supply and demand. Other developed counties send people to college without the debt and have much better occupation internship programs for high school students. Post World War II GI benefit users created the largest increase in demand for college education in our history but did not create the rising costs. The economy and politics of the '70's created the jump in cost. We have recordings from the Oval Office of both Johnson (Democrat) and Nixon (Republican) discussing how increasing the debt of college graduates would be the best way to control and limit anti-war and civil rights protesters. That and the simple economics of the effects of double-digit inflation lead to a great reduction in government support to universities. Schools had to make up that money from somewhere and that that lead to the rise in tuition and fees. It has also lead to universities relying heavily on adjunct professors that earn around $25 thousand a year with no benefits but that's for a different discussion. 

 

Our economy soared in the '50's due largely to the increased number of college graduates earning more and then spending more money. There are your effects of supply and demand. The quickest way to jumpstart our economy would be to allow more people to graduate with some sort of tertiary education and without the debt. That would lead to a huge infusion of cash into our economy.

 

Really all my first post was trying to say I don't think we as a nation value education and science as much as we should (in hindsight since my evidence was mostly anecdotal I should have said Nebraskans don't value education and science as much as we should)  and I am really looking forward to the start basketball season.

 

You're mistaking correlation and causation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Norm Peterson said:

 

You're mistaking correlation and causation.

About what aspect? 

All the statistics belay your assertion that college doesn't provide as many advantages as it used to. The data shows it is more important today then it had been in the past. And there is empirical data including many universities openly stating that the reduced government support directly lead to the rising cost of tuition and fees. 

Edited by Dean Smith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might make $2.3 million more with a college degree than without....however

 

If you took $50,000 and invested it at age 22 instead of spending roughly $50.000 on an education at age 22.....you would have about $6.4 million at age 71 if invested in the broad market and achieved a 10% return over those 49 years.

 

Youth is wasted on the Young.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Blindcheck said:

You might make $2.3 million more with a college degree than without....however

 

If you took $50,000 and invested it at age 22 instead of spending roughly $50.000 on an education at age 22.....you would have about $6.4 million at age 71 if invested in the broad market and achieved a 10% return over those 49 years.

 

Youth is wasted on the Young.

 

 

 

Good gawd what the hell was I thinking?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Blindcheck said:

You might make $2.3 million more with a college degree than without....however

 

If you took $50,000 and invested it at age 22 instead of spending roughly $50.000 on an education at age 22.....you would have about $6.4 million at age 71 if invested in the broad market and achieved a 10% return over those 49 years.

 

Youth is wasted on the Young.

 

 

Not a lot of 22-year-olds (college or not) have $50,000. If they did, they wouldn't need to take out loans to pay for school. 

 

But it it is an interesting point, for sure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a guy in my early 30's who graduated college at the start of the great recession, I've found that many acquaintances my age are a decade behind in their careers.  Those were generally the same people that graduated with communications and sociology-types of degrees, or graduated with a more career-specific degree but with poor grades.  Those of us that achieved academic success in a career-specific major (finance, engineering, actuarial science, nursing, etc.) still found good jobs right away, regardless of the recession.  Granted, the economy has stabilized a lot in the past nine years, but at least in my anecdotal experience there is a giant gap in demand among different majors.

 

Regarding the thought that a college education should be viewed as something other than what it is--- a prerequisite and training for your future job---I could not disagree more.  I had lots of friends in college that wandered from major to major wasting their parents' money and/or accumulating debt.  They all had this point of view in common, and it drove me bonkers.  For some people, college is about finding yourself and enlightenment.  That amounts to one very expensive hobby if you're going to college without some specific career opportunities in mind.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×