Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MichHusker

Current stats compared to the BIg 10

Recommended Posts

Offensive Stats

Points per possession:  0.819 (Last in the Big 10) #1: Michigan (1.036)

FG%: 40.4% (Last in the Big 10) #1: Purdue (50%)

Adjusted FG%: 44.7% (Last in the Big 10) #1: Purdue (59%)

% of poss where we scored at least 1 point: 38.9% (Last in the Big 10) #1: Purdue (45.9%)

Turnover %: 15.9% (7th in the Big 10) #1: Michigan (13.2%)

 

For reference: Michigan: SOS=159th, 2 RPI top 100 wins  Purdue: SOS=69th, 2 RPI top 100 wins Nebraska: SOS=10th, 1 RPI top 100 win

 

Offensive Possessions (PPP) Breakdown (compared to NCAA)

Spot ups: 153 points on 200 poss= .765   7th percentile=POOR rating

P&R, ballhandler shoots: 127 points on 160 poss= .794    61st percentile= GOOD rating

Transition: 114 points on 107 poss= 1.065    57th percentile= GOOD rating

Off rebounds (putbacks): 76 points on 87 poss= .874     9th percentile= POOR rating

Post ups: 52 points on 68 poss= .765     35th percentile=AVERAGE rating

Cuts: 57 points on 66 poss= .864     4th percentile= POOR rating

Hand offs: 43 points on 53 poss= .811     51st percentile= GOOD rating

Isolation: 35 points on 43 poss= .814     57th percentile= GOOD rating

P&R, roll man shoots: 34 points on 42 poss= .81    27th percentile= BELOW AVERAGE rating

 

Thoughts

We need to run more. Our transition game is our best friend right now and we need to utilize it as much as possible. If we cannot get a good look with the initial break then our secondary break needs to involve several ball screens where we can attack the defense without being competely set up.

Defensive Stats

Points per possession: 0.841 (10th in the Big 10) #1: Minnesota (0.753)

FG%: 42.7% (13th in the Big 10) #1: Minnesota (36.1%)

Adjusted FG%: 48.4% (12th in the Big 10) #1: Minnesota (41%)

% of poss where we allow at least 1 point: 39.9% (13th in the Big 10) #1. Rutgers (34.4%)

Turnover %: 17.3% (2nd in the Big 10) #1: Michigan (17.9%)

 

For reference: Minnesota: SOS=51st, 3 RPI top 100 wins  Rutgers: SOS=314th, 0 RPI top 100 wins

 

Defensive Possessions (PPP) Breakdown (Compared to NCAA)

Spot ups: 175 points on 184 poss= .951   34th percentile=AVERAGE rating

Transition: 152 points on 153 poss= .993    54th percentile= GOOD rating

P&R, ballhandler shoots: 65 points on 109 poss= .596    89th percentile= EXCELLENT rating

Post ups: 55 points on 70 poss= .786     49th percentile=AVERAGE rating

P&R, roll man shoots: 60 points on 67 poss= .896    59th percentile= GOOD rating

Off Screen: 48 points on 53 poss= .906    41st percentile= AVERAGE rating

Isolation: 34 points on 49 poss= .694     69th percentile=  VERY GOOD rating

Cuts: 47 points on 45 poss= 1.04     65th percentile= VERY GOOD rating

Off rebounds (putbacks): 40 points 0n 37 poss= 1.08     44th percentile= AVERAGE rating

 

Thoughts

Defense up to this point hasn't been to bad, although I would like to see be better against post ups. This team really just needs more life on offense, and hopefully the emergene of Horne along with a seemingly improving Anton Gill will help that. We will need all the help we can get and I am hopefull we can find a way to win at least 7 or 8 Big 10 games.

 

Edited by MichHusker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remembering back to pre-Molinari. We would double team, trap, jump passing lanes and get out in transition. Am I making this up? That 2013-14 season, the first in PBA, we would try and create a little more havoc on the defensive end. Once Petteway or whomever would steal a pass in the lane, we were down the floor in transition. I think we need to get back to doing that. I might be inventing the Molinari correlation in my mind but it seems like he brought a different defensive philosophy with him where trapping is disallowed. It's more about sagging off and cutting off driving lanes. And then we just don't push the ball as much any more. Somebody with more basketball knowledge chew on that a little bit and let me know I'm right about Molinari.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ajb5856 said:

Remembering back to pre-Molinari. We would double team, trap, jump passing lanes and get out in transition. Am I making this up? That 2013-14 season, the first in PBA, we would try and create a little more havoc on the defensive end. Once Petteway or whomever would steal a pass in the lane, we were down the floor in transition. I think we need to get back to doing that. I might be inventing the Molinari correlation in my mind but it seems like he brought a different defensive philosophy with him where trapping is disallowed. It's more about sagging off and cutting off driving lanes. And then we just don't push the ball as much any more. Somebody with more basketball knowledge chew on that a little bit and let me know I'm right about Molinari.

You are exactly right in my opinion.  Our defense was so much better back than.  This was debated by the many Molinari supporters and myself (who doesn't think we have played very good basketball since he got here) with stats a long time ago.  It goes deeper than just stats though IMO.  You have to watch what is going on, and you nailed it here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, royalfan said:

You are exactly right in my opinion.  Our defense was so much better back than.  This was debated by the many Molinari supporters and myself (who doesn't think we have played very good basketball since he got here) with stats a long time ago.  It goes deeper than just stats though IMO.  You have to watch what is going on, and you nailed it here. 

 

And just to keep this going...Molinari has very much a gum it up and make the game ugly style. It's what he had to do in order to give his team a chance in games at Western Illinois. He had a lesser athlete and that's how he had to play to give his teams a shot. Well guess what? We have the athletes now. I'm betting this team would do better if they were turned loose to do their athlete stuff. How about a "go

out and play" mentality? We have the athletes here. We have some players. We no longer need to feel inferior. Just go out and compete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Different. The defense was different back then. Virginia has athletes and they play the pack line. There is a sliding scale of pressure. On one end is don't give up easy shots. When that is your focus you create very few turnovers. On the other end is trap and create turnovers. When that is your focus you will give up more easy shots. Then there is everything in between. The more pressure, the more easy shots given up. The fewer easy shots given up, the fewer turnovers created. Personally, I don't like some of the pack lines' rotations and principles but I like the idea of not giving up easy shots.

 

When I coached my teams had two M-4-M's. We sagged off and tried not to give up easy shots. Then depending on the situation or our desire, we moved sporadically to the North Carolina run & trap. When used infrequently and as a surprise, the full pressure was more successful in creating turnovers and giving up fewer easy shots. Trap first dribbler was more successful at creating turnovers than trap first pass but it is also easier to break down to get an easy shot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×