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Coaches that you think should be on Nebraska's list, if this trend continues

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Bino Ranson - Maryland (Assistant)

 

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Orlando "Bino" Ranson was hired as an assistant coach at Maryland in the summer of 2010 and is now entering his seventh season in College Park, including the sixth on the staff of head coach Mark Turgeon.

 

During his time with Turgeon,  Ranson and the Terps have collected 114 wins, the most in a five-year span in program history.

Ranson played a major part in helping lead the Terps to consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances, including a berth in the Sweet Sixteen during the 2015-16 season. It marked the Terps’ longest run in the NCAA Tournament since 2003. In the 2015-16 season, Maryland started 15-1 – the best start in program history and finished the campaign with a 27-9 overall record No. 12 ranking in the USA Today Coaches Poll.

 

"Bino has done an outstanding job in identifying and developing talented basketball players,” said Turgeon. “He has strong connections throughout the country and helped expand our recruiting area during our transition to the Big Ten. Bino has worked hard and has developed into a very good coach.”

 

Ranson and the Terrapins have been ranked in the Associated Press Top-25 for 35 consecutive weeks. In the past two seasons, Maryland has posted 55 wins, the second most in a two-year span in program history.

 

In their inaugural season in the Big Ten (2014-15), Ranson and the Terrapins posted a school record 26 regular season wins en route to advancing to the NCAA Tournament.

 

Ranson played a major role in helping Maryland sign five consecutive top-25 recruiting classes in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. He played a lead role in signing center Diamond Stone (Milwaukee, Wisc.) – a McDonald’s All-American who was rated as a consensus top 10 player by a myriad of national recruiting services. Stone went on to be drafted by the Los Angeles Clippers in the second round of the 2016 NBA Draft.

 

In 2016, Ranson led the recruiting efforts for consensus four-star forward Justin Jackson, who played high school basketball at national power Findlay Prep as a junior before finishing his high school career at Hill Academy in Ontario, where he was named a First Team All-Star in the Ontario Scholastics Basketball Association. He was also a member of the Canadian U-19 national team that participated at the 2015 FIBA World Championships in Greece. Ranson has strong ties to the Baltimore-Washington area, having coached for two seasons at St. Frances Academy in Baltimore.

 

He came to Maryland after one season as an assistant at Xavier, during which the Musketeers went 26-9 and reached the NCAA Sweet Sixteen. In his lone season on the staff of Maryland head coach Gary Williams in 2010-11, the Terrapins went 19-14. Ranson has had a winning season in each of his 11 seasons as an assistant coach. He spent two years as an administrative assistant at Loyola University on the staff of long-time Maryland assistant  and current Siena head coach Jimmy Patsos. Prior to Xavier, Ranson was an assistant coach at James Madison for one season, helping the Dukes to a 21-15 mark, the most wins by JMU in a season since 1992-93. The Dukes advanced in the Colonial Athletic Association Tournament for the first time since 2003 and their berth in the College Insiders.com Tournament marked their first postseason appearance since 1994. 

 

Ranson also worked for Matt Brady at Marist University for three seasons. The Red Foxes were 62-33 in those three seasons and won the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference regular season in 2007. That season, Marist won at Oklahoma State in the Postseason NIT.

 

Considered an outstanding recruiter, he helped bring in excellent classes at James Madison, Marist and Xavier. Ranson helped land Jay Gavin at Marist, who went on to become the MAAC Rookie of the Year. Ranson coached at St. Frances Academy for two seasons before joining the Loyola staff. He handled St. Frances' junior-varsity program, directing the 2003-04 team to a 24-5 record, titles in the MIAA and the Baltimore Catholic League. He also founded Team Baltimore, one of the top AAU programs in the Northeast.

 

Among the players Ranson worked with at the AAU level are Sean Mosley and Juan Dixon of Maryland, Ricky Harris of Massachusetts, Jermaine Dixon of Pittsburgh and Donte Greene of Syracuse. A 1999 graduate of Southern New Hampshire with a B.S. in sports management, Ranson completed his collegiate career as one of the top players in the history of the school. He ranked seventh in career scoring (1,899 points), fifth in assists (598) and fourth in 3-point field goals (226) after lettering for four seasons. He was inducted into the school's hall of fame in January 2007.

 

http://www.umterps.com/ViewArticle.dbml?ATCLID=207324750

Edited by Nebrasketballer

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Kenny Payne - Kentucky (Assistant)

 

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Kenny Payne will enter his seventh year with John Calipari and the Kentucky men’s basketball program in 2015-16. He was promoted to associate head coach in May of 2014 after serving his first four seasons as an assistant coach. Prior to his arrival at UK he served as an assistant at Oregon for six seasons.

 

Payne’s work with Kentucky’s big men has played an instrumental role in UK’s NBA Draft success. Payne’s development with Anthony Davis and Karl-Anthony Towns helped the Kentucky freshmen go No. 1 overall in their respective drafts.

Payne was also a key in the development of Julius Randle, who was taken seventh overall in the 2014 NBA Draft, Nerlens Noel, who was drafted sixth overall in 2013, and Josh Harrellson who became a second-round draft pick following a breakout senior campaign in 2011.


Nationally recognized as one of the game’s top recruiters, Payne’s ability to recruit has continued to flourish at Kentucky. He played a key part in Calipari’s last six recruiting classes. The 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2016 classes all ranked No. 1 in the country, according to the Recruiting Services Consensus Index. UK’s 2014 class had four McDonald’s All-Americans and was rated No. 2 overall. The 2013 class consisted of a record six McDonald’s All-Americans and was heralded as one of the best classes ever assembled by many pundits.

 

Payne hasn’t only helped recruit players to Kentucky though, he’s also helped develop them into stars. In five of the six years since Payne arrived at UK, the Cats have had a post player chosen in the top 10 of the NBA Draft. In all six at least one has gone in the first round.

 

Kentucky has advanced to the Final Four in four of the six seasons in which Payne has been on staff, including in 2015, when, in his first year as an associate head coach, Payne helped guide the Wildcats to the first 38-0 record in college basketball history.

 

Payne’s first season as part of the Kentucky staff came during the 2010-11 season as the Wildcats advanced to the Final Four, the first in the Calipari era.
Kentucky then captured the national championship during Payne’s second season and Davis was the recipient of numerous national player of the year accolades.

 

Payne was instrumental in helping lead UK back to the national title game in 2014 behind the play of Randle, an All-American forward who broke freshman records in rebounding, double-doubles and free throws made.

 

During his tenure at Oregon, Payne helped the Ducks burst onto the national scene with two NCAA Tournament appearances in 2007 and 2008. Oregon also claimed one Pacific-10 Tournament title and three Ducks were selected in the first and second rounds of the NBA Draft under Payne.

 

During the 2006-07 season, the Ducks recorded an 11-7 Pac-10 record and posted an undefeated mark in non-conference regular-season games, finishing with a 29-8 overall record. That season, Oregon captured the Pac-10 Tournament, and followed the tournament run with an impressive performance at the NCAA Tournament. The Ducks earned a No. 3 seed in the tournament and advanced to the Elite Eight, where they lost to eventual champions Florida.

The Ducks followed their Elite Eight run with another appearance in the 2008 NCAA Tournament. Payne and the Oregon coaching staff then reigned in a top-20 recruiting class for the 2008 season with six highly touted recruits.

 

Prior to coaching, Payne traveled the globe playing basketball for 10 different professional leagues. In 1989, Payne was chosen in the first round and 19th overall in the NBA Draft, playing four years for the Philadelphia 76ers.

 

Payne competed in the Continental Basketball Association (Tri-Cities, Wash.) and overseas in Italy, Japan, Brazil, the Philippines, Cypress, China and Argentina. He finished his professional career in 2000 following a season with Team Taipans of Cairns in Australia.

A four-year letterwinner at Louisville from 1985-89, Payne joined the Cardinals from Northeast Jones High School in Laurel, Mississippi, where he was a Parade All-American and the state’s player of the year.

 

Payne helped lead Louisville to the 1986 NCAA national championship as a sophomore when he appeared in 34 games and averaged 3.6 points per game. As a senior, Payne averaged 14.5 points and 5.7 rebounds and was named second team All-Metro Conference.

By the end of his Louisville career, Payne registered 1,083 points and shot 40 percent from 3-point range.
Payne earned a Bachelor of Science in sport administration from Louisville in 2003.

 

http://www.coachcal.com/about-cal/coaching-staff/kenny-payne/

Edited by Nebrasketballer

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Dana Altman - Oregon (Head Coach)

 

Dana Altman is one of only six active coaches in NCAA Division I with 19 consecutive winning seasons. He is part of an exclusive fraternity that includes Mike Krzyzewski, Tom Izzo, Roy Williams, Bill Self and Jim Boeheim.

 

The 2013 National Coach of the Year and three-time Pac-12 Coach of the Year has won more games in his first six seasons than any coach in Oregon history. Altman is 154-64 in Eugene, and 564-307 in 27 seasons as a head coach at the NCAA Division I level in stints at Oregon, Creighton, Kansas State and Marshall.

 

Altman, the 19th head coach in the history of the University of Oregon men’s basketball program, has led the Ducks to six consecutive 20-win seasons and six postseason appearances, including four straight NCAA Tournaments for the first time in school history, winning at least one game in each of those years. Included in those NCAA appearances are an Elite Eight (2016) and a pair of Sweet 16s (2013, 2016). Altman now has 18 seasons of 20-plus wins to his credit (11 at Creighton, six at Oregon, one at Kansas State).

 

The 2015-16 season saw Altman reach new heights as a coach and achieve honors matched only by some of the very best mentors in the history of the Pac-12 Conference. The Ducks’ 31 wins were not only a school record, but also the most for Altman at the Division I level as he guided Oregon to the Pac-12’s regular season and conference title in the same year for the first time in school history. He also reached the NCAA’s Elite Eight for the first time and was named Pac-12 Coach of the Year for the third time in four seasons, a feat matched only by Hall of Famer Lute Olson of Arizona. The individual honors won by players under his guidance included all-American Dillon Brooks, Pac-12 Tournament MOP Elgin Cook, Pac-12 all-defensive selection Chris Boucher and Pac-12 all-freshman pick Tyler Dorsey.

 

In 2014-15, in one of the finest coaching performances of his career, Altman guided a team that had only three returning scholarship players to 26-10 record, a runner-up finish in the Pac-12 (13-5) and the third round of the NCAA Tournament.

 

He was the runaway choice for Pac-12 Coach of the Year, while Joseph Young ied the school single-season scoring record in being named Pac-12 Player of the Year. Cook was an all-Pac-12 second-team selection, while Jordan Bell and Brooks made the Pac-12’s all-freshman team.


The 2013-14 season saw Altman win his 500th game as a Division I head coach when Oregon defeated Washington on Feb. 19. He also joined Basketball Hall of Famer Howard Hobson as the only men to lead Oregon to four consecutive 20-win seasons. He guided Oregon to a 24-10 overall record and an NCAA Tournament win. Young was an all-conference second team selection and an all-Pac-12 tournament pick, while Mike Moser was an honorable mention selection by the conference.

 

Altman’s 2012-13 Oregon Ducks became the first UO team since 2008 to qualify for the NCAA Tournament. The Ducks finished the season 28-9 and won the Pac-12 Tournament. Altman was named the Pac-12 Coach of the Year before going on to earn Jim Phelan National Coach of the Year honors. Senior E.J. Singler was an all-league first team selection, while Johnathan Loyd was named Most Outstanding Player of the Pac-12 Tournament as the honors were spread around nearly the entire team. Senior Arsalan Kazemi was a Pac-12 all-defensive pick before going on to become a second round draft choice of the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers.

 

During the 2011-12 season, Altman led the Ducks to a 24-10 overall record and a 13-5 Pac-12 Conference mark which was good for a share of second place in the final league standings. The Ducks earned a bid to the National Invitation Tournament and recorded victories over LSU and Iowa before falling at top-seed Washington in the tournament quarterfinals. Under Altman’s tutelage, four UO players were recognized as part of the 2012 Pac-12 All-Conference teams. Devoe Joseph became the first Duck since the 2006-07 season to be named first team all-conference. Singler was named to the all-conference second team and NABC All-District 20 second team, while Garrett Sim earned honorable mention all-league recognition and Tony Woods was named honorable mention all-defensive team.

 

In his first season at Oregon, Altman led the Ducks to just the 12th season of 20+ victories in the history of the program. He became just the third UO head coach to tally 20+ wins in his first season on the job. Oregon went 21-18 overall and 7-11 in Pac-12 play which earned them a seventh-place finish in the final league standings. Altman posted the second-highest win total of any first-year UO head coach. Only John Warren (30 wins in 1944-45) posted more in his first year on the sidelines. The 2011 postseason included a pair of wins at the Pac-10 Tournament, highlighted by a 76-59 upset win over No. 2-seed UCLA in the quarterfinals. Oregon participated in the 2011 College Basketball Invitational, defeating Altman’s former team Creighton in the best-of-three championship series.

 

Altman arrived at UO after spending 16 seasons at Creighton where he became the school’s all-time winningest coach with a record of 327-176 (.650). He led the Blue Jays to 13 consecutive postseason appearances, a stretch of 11 straight seasons with 20-plus wins, all while producing 10 or more league victories in each of the last 14 seasons. Those three feats were unmatched in the 103 years of the Missouri Valley Conference.

 

He won four Coach-of-the-Year awards from three different conferences in a span of 13 seasons, including back-to-back MVC coaching honors while he was at the Omaha, Neb., school in 2001 and 2002. Altman was a finalist for the Naismith National Coach of the Year Award and was named the NABC District 12 and USBWA District VI Coach of the Year following the 2002-03 campaign.

Creighton participated in seven NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournaments and five National Invitation Tournaments under Altman, advancing to the second round of the NCAA championships in both the 1998-99 and 2001-02 seasons. He led the school to a MVC regular-season title in 2000-01 - its first in 10 years. The Bluejays posted a school-record 29 wins in 2002-03, finishing the season 15th in the Associated Press poll and 23rd in the coaches’ voting.

 

Altman finished his career at Creighton ranking third all-time on the MVC list of all-time wins (327), trailing only Basketball Hall of Fame coaches Henry Iba (486) and Eddie Hickey (337). In 2007, he was one of 10 coaches named as part of the MVC’s All-Centennial Team. His teams claimed shares of three regular-season Missouri Valley Conference championships (including the 2008-09 crown) and six conference post-season tournament titles.


Student-athletes under his direction at CU earned six All-America honors on the court and four Academic All-America laurels in the classroom. Three players he coached at Creighton - Kyle Korver, Rodney Buford and Anthony Tolliver - have played in the NBA.

 

Along the way, Creighton established school records for most victories in a two-year (52), three-year (76) and four-year span (99). From 1998-99 through 2008-09, Creighton was one of just six schools to win 20 or more games each of those seasons, an elite list that also included Duke, Florida, Gonzaga, Kansas and Syracuse.

 

Altman compiled a 68-54 record in four seasons (1990-94) at Kansas State. During that time, Altman led the Wildcats to three straight postseason tourneys and was named the Big Eight Conference Coach of the Year after leading KSU to a 19-11 record and an appearance in the NCAA Tournament in 1993.

 

Altman’s final Kansas State club turned heads nationally with a 68-64 win at No. 1 Kansas on Jan. 17, 1994. K-State eventually advanced to play in the NIT Final Four. Altman’s success at KSU followed him from a brief head coaching stint at Marshall where he was named Southern Conference Coach of the Year in 1990.

 

While head coach at Southeast Junior College in Fairbury, Neb., his first team (1982-83) rolled to a 29-6 record and a third-place finish in the junior college national tournament and Altman was honored as both Region 9 and the Nebraska College Coach of the Year.


In 1983, Altman accepted the head coaching position at Moberly (Mo.) Junior College, with a three-year run resulting in a staggering 94-18 record (25-9 in 1983-84; 35-5 with a third-place finish at the national tourney in 1984-85; and a 34-4 mark in 1985-86 with a sixth-place finish at nationals).


He was named Region 16 Coach of the Year in both the 1984-85 and 1985-86 seasons, and was also a finalist for 1986 National Junior College Athletic Association Coach of the Year accolades.


Altman’s playing career began at Southeast Junior College in 1976, where he captained teams to a 22-10 mark in his freshman year and a 26-5 record in his sophomore season.


Altman completed his undergraduate education and playing career at Eastern New Mexico University. After earning his associate degree in business administration from Southeast in 1978, Altman graduated magna cum laude from Eastern New Mexico in 1980 with his bachelor’s degree in the same field.


Altman received his master of business administration degree from Western (Colo.) State in 1981. He served as an assistant coach on the Western State staff from 1980-82.

 

http://www.goducks.com/coaches.aspx?rc=1416&path=mbball

Edited by Nebrasketballer

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What Nebraska needs to be successful - I truly think we need something unique to us. We're never going to out Michigan State Izzo. We're never going to out Wisconsin the Badgers. We need something that will be unique to us (I'm trying not to use the word gimmick). I was at no sit Sunday, I think we could have beaten Duke or KU had they been at the Vault that day. I think maybe our something special could be "The Vault". I want to see a style that is conducive to the fans being on their feet and scaring the crap out of our opponents. Not a three man weave offense that in turn takes our fans out of the game, and keeps the players from playing loose. 

 

Now I don't know who the coach that could do that is - Maybe Miles wins 11 B1G games and gets the ship righted. Maybe a guy like Bino or Payne could bring kids in that play loose and make the Vault a living hell for opponents. I just think we need something that sets us apart from other teams, and makes Nebraska a destination for a certain type of player. Its hard to get kids into the Tim Miles, defense first, stagnant offense system and I truly think the current system works against our kids confidence shooting the ball, and getting our fans on their feet.

 

*this may be a bunch of gibberish, but its hard to formulate that thought to paper.

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Altman would never accept a head coaching job here so you can just forget that idea. He was looked over by Nebraska and has a passionate grudge against our program. On top of that he's doing very well at Oregon and coming here at this point isn't even a lateral move for him. We need to go for assistants at successful programs (which I prefer) or quality head coaches at mid-majors. I really wish we would've went harder for Greg Marshall. I think we should offer him whatever he wants to come here.

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1 hour ago, Nebrasketballer said:

Kenny Payne - Kentucky (Assistant)

 

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Kenny Payne will enter his seventh year with John Calipari and the Kentucky men’s basketball program in 2015-16. He was promoted to associate head coach in May of 2014 after serving his first four seasons as an assistant coach. Prior to his arrival at UK he served as an assistant at Oregon for six seasons.

 

Payne’s work with Kentucky’s big men has played an instrumental role in UK’s NBA Draft success. Payne’s development with Anthony Davis and Karl-Anthony Towns helped the Kentucky freshmen go No. 1 overall in their respective drafts.

Payne was also a key in the development of Julius Randle, who was taken seventh overall in the 2014 NBA Draft, Nerlens Noel, who was drafted sixth overall in 2013, and Josh Harrellson who became a second-round draft pick following a breakout senior campaign in 2011.


Nationally recognized as one of the game’s top recruiters, Payne’s ability to recruit has continued to flourish at Kentucky. He played a key part in Calipari’s last six recruiting classes. The 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2016 classes all ranked No. 1 in the country, according to the Recruiting Services Consensus Index. UK’s 2014 class had four McDonald’s All-Americans and was rated No. 2 overall. The 2013 class consisted of a record six McDonald’s All-Americans and was heralded as one of the best classes ever assembled by many pundits.

 

Payne hasn’t only helped recruit players to Kentucky though, he’s also helped develop them into stars. In five of the six years since Payne arrived at UK, the Cats have had a post player chosen in the top 10 of the NBA Draft. In all six at least one has gone in the first round.

 

Kentucky has advanced to the Final Four in four of the six seasons in which Payne has been on staff, including in 2015, when, in his first year as an associate head coach, Payne helped guide the Wildcats to the first 38-0 record in college basketball history.

 

Payne’s first season as part of the Kentucky staff came during the 2010-11 season as the Wildcats advanced to the Final Four, the first in the Calipari era.
Kentucky then captured the national championship during Payne’s second season and Davis was the recipient of numerous national player of the year accolades.

 

Payne was instrumental in helping lead UK back to the national title game in 2014 behind the play of Randle, an All-American forward who broke freshman records in rebounding, double-doubles and free throws made.

 

During his tenure at Oregon, Payne helped the Ducks burst onto the national scene with two NCAA Tournament appearances in 2007 and 2008. Oregon also claimed one Pacific-10 Tournament title and three Ducks were selected in the first and second rounds of the NBA Draft under Payne.

 

During the 2006-07 season, the Ducks recorded an 11-7 Pac-10 record and posted an undefeated mark in non-conference regular-season games, finishing with a 29-8 overall record. That season, Oregon captured the Pac-10 Tournament, and followed the tournament run with an impressive performance at the NCAA Tournament. The Ducks earned a No. 3 seed in the tournament and advanced to the Elite Eight, where they lost to eventual champions Florida.

The Ducks followed their Elite Eight run with another appearance in the 2008 NCAA Tournament. Payne and the Oregon coaching staff then reigned in a top-20 recruiting class for the 2008 season with six highly touted recruits.

 

Prior to coaching, Payne traveled the globe playing basketball for 10 different professional leagues. In 1989, Payne was chosen in the first round and 19th overall in the NBA Draft, playing four years for the Philadelphia 76ers.

 

Payne competed in the Continental Basketball Association (Tri-Cities, Wash.) and overseas in Italy, Japan, Brazil, the Philippines, Cypress, China and Argentina. He finished his professional career in 2000 following a season with Team Taipans of Cairns in Australia.

A four-year letterwinner at Louisville from 1985-89, Payne joined the Cardinals from Northeast Jones High School in Laurel, Mississippi, where he was a Parade All-American and the state’s player of the year.

 

Payne helped lead Louisville to the 1986 NCAA national championship as a sophomore when he appeared in 34 games and averaged 3.6 points per game. As a senior, Payne averaged 14.5 points and 5.7 rebounds and was named second team All-Metro Conference.

By the end of his Louisville career, Payne registered 1,083 points and shot 40 percent from 3-point range.
Payne earned a Bachelor of Science in sport administration from Louisville in 2003.

 

http://www.coachcal.com/about-cal/coaching-staff/kenny-payne/

 

Do we have boosters with deep enough pockets to pay  recuit the kind of player his is used to having play for him at Kentucky?  

 

And I am serious about that,  It is just a matter of time before they get caught, Calipari will be gone but it will come, just like everywhere he has been.

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16 minutes ago, Silverbacked1 said:

 

Do we have boosters with deep enough pockets to pay  recuit the kind of player his is used to having play for him at Kentucky?  

 

And I am serious about that,  It is just a matter of time before they get caught, Calipari will be gone but it will come, just like everywhere he has been.

 

The same can be said about Bino

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2 hours ago, The Polish Rifle said:

What Nebraska needs to be successful - I truly think we need something unique to us. We're never going to out Michigan State Izzo. We're never going to out Wisconsin the Badgers. We need something that will be unique to us (I'm trying not to use the word gimmick). I was at no sit Sunday, I think we could have beaten Duke or KU had they been at the Vault that day. I think maybe our something special could be "The Vault". I want to see a style that is conducive to the fans being on their feet and scaring the crap out of our opponents. Not a three man weave offense that in turn takes our fans out of the game, and keeps the players from playing loose. 

 

Now I don't know who the coach that could do that is - Maybe Miles wins 11 B1G games and gets the ship righted. Maybe a guy like Bino or Payne could bring kids in that play loose and make the Vault a living hell for opponents. I just think we need something that sets us apart from other teams, and makes Nebraska a destination for a certain type of player. Its hard to get kids into the Tim Miles, defense first, stagnant offense system and I truly think the current system works against our kids confidence shooting the ball, and getting our fans on their feet.

 

*this may be a bunch of gibberish, but its hard to formulate that thought to paper.

We had a pretty good offense last year.  We also had a guy that could hit multiple 3's at a 40% + clip that wanted out of town because the coach wouldn't change his offense to suit him.  Right now, we are trying to run the same offense with nobody who can hit an outside shot.

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13 minutes ago, Nebrasketballer said:

On 1620, Matt Vrzal talking about possible coaching candidates for Nebrasketball:

 

"Damon Benning just texted me Fred Hoiberg. And Hoiberg has family connections to Nebraska."

 

Hoiberg was making $2.6M at Iowa State. He's making $5M/year (5 year contract totaling $25M total) at the Chicago Bulls. Miles is making $2.0M/year through 2020.

 

Either pay up or shut up.

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Hoiberg was making $2.6M at Iowa State. He's making $5M/year (5 year contract totaling $25M total) at the Chicago Bulls. Miles is making $2.0M/year through 2020.
 
Either pay up or shut up.




 
The same can be said about Bino


I vote pay up or you will see sub 7k crowds.

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15 hours ago, brfrad said:

We had a pretty good offense last year.  We also had a guy that could hit multiple 3's at a 40% + clip that wanted out of town because the coach wouldn't change his offense to suit him.  Right now, we are trying to run the same offense with nobody who can hit an outside shot.

Agree but there in lies the problem, Div 1 basketball programs should have several kids that can hit an outside shot.

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